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Snake Plant is a Great Greenhouse Plant

Posted June 22nd, 2018 by Robin Nichols in ,

Scientific Name: Sansevieria trifasciata

Common Names: Cast-Iron Plant, Barbershop Plant, Mother In-Law’s Tongue & Snake Plant, Bowstring Hemp, Devil’s Tongue, Good Luck Plant, Lucky Plant.

Light Needs: Tolerates low light, even dim corners but can also tolerate some direct light.

Best Temperatures: Does best in average room temperatures and can tolerate some frost.

Water and Humidity: Drench then let it dry.

Growing Guidelines: Repot every 5 years in all-purpose soil mix and fertilize once every spring.

Common Problems: Spider mites may occasionally attack the foliage.

Propagation: Divide the roots in early spring.

Fun Facts

These plants are called cast-iron plants because they are very difficult to kill. They are very hardy and thrive on neglect but do grow very slowly. There is a number of these succulent type varieties available that includes, golden edged leaves, white edged and the green and grayish mottled type. The golden edged leaf S. trifasciata laurentii is the most common of these.

Small greenish white flowers can appear once this species matures in age. This seems as though it happens by luck rather than effort for some growers. Keeping to the correct conditions gives the plant a higher chance of buds and then flowers appearing. While all plants purify air-borne toxins the snake plant is among the top plants tested and added to a list by NASA for removing, benzene, formaldehyde and other harmful toxins. This plant is not highly toxic but it is considered poisonous for pets and will cause discomfort and illness if ingested.

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